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PUMA Re-Cut Project

Combining design with the reuse of materials and social impacts, sparked the idea behind PUMA’s launch of the Re-Cut Project. 

Post-production scraps are all part of the game when it comes to designing apparel. A desire to waste less, recycle more and steer our materials through a more efficient chain is one increasingly shared across the sector. Consciously growing more aware of sustainability issues, industry players are sparking up ideas more than ever before.
 

Over at Saitex, PUMA’s denim partner, the story was no different to that at any other denim manufacturer, with test panels cut to evaluate the quality of denim before production is launched. Taking a step back and looking at their daily routine PUMA and Saitex have together drawn a cleverer path for these leftover denim test panels. Often taking the easy direct route to the landfill, PUMA have long been committed to steering their leftovers elsewhere along more sustainable routes. With Re-Cut Project, scraps are seen as quiet the opposite to waste, being used to create the uppers of footwear for a stylish spring silhouette.

“PUMA IS DEDICATED TO CREATING PRODUCTS THAT WORK TOWARDS THE CLOSED LOOP MODEL AND HAVE A LOWER IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT. INITIATIVES SUCH AS THE RE-CUT PROJECT ARE A DEMONSTRATION OF HOW THIS CAN BE ACHIEVED WHILST BENEFITING A LOCAL COMMUNITY.”

 

Cutting down waste like this tackles sustainability right from the beginning of the lifecycle, but move right along to the end of the footwear’s cycle and there too you will find sustainable practices. A few hundred metres stroll down the road from the PUMA offices in Ho Chi Minh City, you will find the result of the collection’s revenues: the Be Tho Orphanage. Weaving in a social aspect to the project, for each item of footwear sold, 100% of profits go directly from the consumer’s pocket to support this local venture; funding medical care, recreational activities and food at the orphanage.

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