Group

Gardens

More than half the surface at 40, rue de Sèvres is covered in gardens. Landscape gardener, Philippe Raguin, based his work on architectural renderings by the Chief Architect of France’s historical monuments, but also drew his inspiration from old drawings to bring the site’s gardens back to life. Imbued with history, the landmark site owes its unique feel acquired through the centuries to its green spaces.

jardins de Laennec au 40 rue de Sèvres

“At the very start of our investigation, we found plants that had survived the wasteland years, almost like a collection of relics. These minor miracles gave us a starting point, offering us fragments of memory to conserve and bring back to life.”

Philippe Raguin
Landscape gardener

 

 

Once, the hospital’s incurables would work in the gardens. At the time, medicinal herb and vegetable gardens, orchards, as well as a shaded pathway, were spread over nearly 14,000 m2. Philippe Raguin strived to identify plants and species to closely resemble the array of plants grown in European 17th and 18th century gardens.

 

 

We focused on simplicity and subdued tones: yew trees and variegated arbors in the center along with more ornamental varieties, contrasting with a perennial border abloom in shades of white and pink, with unmanicured foliage thrown in for a poetic touch. With the passing of the seasons, the gardens evoke the peaceful, almost spiritual atmosphere characteristic of the past.

 

 

 

“The unique atmosphere of the place was another source of inspiration. I saw a sort of tiny jewel emerging, an extraordinary space that seemed to exist outside of Paris itself. The city is right on our doorstep and yet we are in another place, where all is calm and silent.”

Philippe Raguin 
Landscape gardener

 

 

Consistent with its aim to place sustainability at the core of the Group’s culture, Kering bans the use of chemical products and allows nature to have its way. The gardens’ initial layout will evolve depending on what the winds or the birds bring. One of the site’s gardens contains five beehives, a reminder of Kering’s commitment to biodiversity.